Posts Tagged ‘WDAZ’

by Timothy Charles Holmseth on August 2, 2016, 12:24 P.M. CST

Producers of a North Dakota television station have been caught tricking the American public about a police shooting by showing time-stamps of dash-cam video; but hiding the times on the body-cams.

The reason for the deception is because the Grand Forks Police Department, University of North Dakota Police Department, North Dakota Highway Patrol, and Grand Forks County Sheriff’s Office is covering up what appears to be an attempted murder connected to drug running and the Fraternal Order of Police.

On February 8, 2015, WDAZ, Forum Communications, aired a news story about a police shooting of an unarmed man that happened on February 28, 2015 in the parking lot of a Grand Forks hospital. The WDAZ story featured police body and dash-cam video that was captured during the bizarre two hour long slow speed pursuit of David James Elliott.

The times of events surrounding the pursuit and shooting of Elliott are easy to establish, because Elliott initiated a 911 call very shortly after a police officer tried to pull him over; and he remained on the phone with 911 for 107 minutes until the moment he was shot.

Elliott’s immediate flight from police, as well as other actions, create a strong appearance he personally knew some of the police officers chasing him and was afraid to pull over because he knew he was going to be killed.

Write Into Action has discovered WDAZ-TV used very specific techniques to obfuscate the time stamps on body-cam worn by an officer at the scene of the shooting as the shots were being fired.

WDAZ covered it up because the body-cam times did not correspond to other dash-cam time-stamps that were being used in the same news story.

The news station deliberately perpetuated a fraud upon trusting viewers.

SYNOPSIS OF THE WDAZ-TV POLICE SHOOTING COVER-UP

On February 28, 2015, UND police officer Jerad Braaten emptied his clip into David James Elliott, Grand Forks, in the parking lot of Altru Hospital at 12:47 A.M.

Police refused to talk to the media for three days following the shooting; would not give the public any details and withheld the name of the victim; it was clear something was not right.

Write Into Action made public records requests to obtain police body and dash-cam videos captured before and after the shooting.

Police body-cam shows David Elliott being shot at 12:36 A.M. (note: time stamp is in Greenwich Mean Time) as shown in the snap-shot below taken at the time shots are heard being fired (note: the blue glob you see on the right side of the image is David Elliott’s tail light).

Body Cam 12 36 Shooting Altru

However, dash-cam (shown below) shows David Elliott sitting atop the Columbia Road Bridge in his truck at 12:36 A.M. where he actually remained for several more minutes.

Dash Cam 12 36 A.M. on Bridge

Obviously, David Elliott was not in his truck on the bridge and being shot in a distant parking lot at the same time.

Below is another dash-cam snap-shot taken at 12:39 A.M. where David Elliott can be seen talking to officers out the window of his pick-up truck atop the Columbia Road Bridge.

Dash Cam 12 39 on Bridge

However, according to the body-cam worn by Sgt. Mark Ellingson, GFPD, the shooting is already over (see below) (see You Tube below for actual sound and video).

Body Cam 12 39 Shooting Altru

UND police chief Eric Plummer stated in a televised joint press release that Elliott was shot at around 12:45 A.M.

That time (12:45 A.M.) is essentially the correct time. Police cam obtained by Write into Action captures the sound of gunshots at 12:47 A.M. when an officer is heard saying “shots fired – shots fired”.

Write Into Action began investigating the shooting in 2015 and began requesting police-cam footage from the Grand Forks Police Department after the case was concluded.

That’s when WDAZ suddenly decided to run a story featuring police-cam video.

On February 8, 2016 WDAZ-TV aired a story about the police shooting where they strategically cover up the time-stamps of the body-cam.

During the introduction to the story, which is entirely critical of David Elliott, body-cam captured at the time of the actual shooting is featured behind the presenters Matt Henson and Stacie Van Dyke.

Van Dyke’s shoulder covers the time-stamp the whole time and it is never seen.

WDAZ cover time stamp

Shortly into the introduction, the video in the background changes from body-cam to dash-cam – the dash-cam shows the time of the shooting is 12:47 A.M. (see below).

It is clear WDAZ is allowing the viewers to see the time-stamps on the dash-cam.

WDAZ 12 47

In the video below, WDAZ again hides the time of the time-stamp on the body-cam by covering it with their logo.

WDAZ cover time stamp

PUBLISHED JULY 30, 2016 by WRITE INTO ACTION

Police-cam evidence captured at a police shooting in Grand Forks, North Dakota will not be turned over to Write Into Action by the Grand Forks Police Department (GFPD) without an Order from the federal court.

In a letter dated July 28, 2016, Grand Forks City Attorney Howard Swanson notified Write Into Action (Timothy Charles Holmseth) that existing requests for police-cam public records are now classified as Discovery, and will only be turned over in accordance with Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Swanson cites Holmseth v. City of Grand Forks et al. (16-cv-02496-JRT-LIB) (District of Minnesota) as the basis for the City’s decision.

Grand Forks City Attorney Howard Swanson

Timothy Holmseth first initiated civil litigation in United States District Court on July 13, 2016 to request an Emergency Injunction that would forbid the planned destruction of police-cam video that capture the police shooting of an unarmed man on February 28, 2015 in the parking lot of Altru Hospital.

Swanson contacted Holmseth after a formal complaint filed by Holmseth against the GFPD Keeper of Records on July 25, 2016, was referred to his office.

Holmseth asserts the GFPD violated state and federal laws when they responded to multiple public records requests for police-cam evidence by providing video that has been carefully altered using a video editor. The alterations were performed to change critical times and conceal specific video pertaining to the events that led up to the shooting of David James Elliott.

North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) inventory records show that after the shooting of Elliott, investigators located the body-cam of University of North Dakota police officer Jerad Braaten underneath his UND squad car.

Braaten, the officer that shot Elliott, who was not even scheduled to work on the night in question, further claimed he was not able to produce his car’s dash-cam because, he said, he forgot to put the memory card in the camera.

On June 26, 2016, GFPD Police Chief Mark Nelson issued a “Special Order” that changed the Department’s policy on retention dates for police-cam video evidence.

Holmseth asserts Nelson’s action is part of a criminal conspiracy by a group of public officials to destroy records that will reveal the truth about the Elliott shooting and other crimes in the area – including the mysterious death of Caitlin Jenna Erickson, which occurred the same night.

On June 16, 2016, a person that identified them self as David James Elliott contacted Holmseth and said Braaten attempted to shoot Elliott while atop the Columbia Road Bridge in Grand Forks, several minutes before the actual shooting, but his gun jammed.

The first attempted shooting of Elliott may be what the GFPD is attempting to cover-up in the videos, because it reveals Braaten’s actions were not spontaneous, and he, along with other officers, were stalking Elliott to kill him.

BCI investigation records appear to support the fact something happened atop the Columbia Road Bridge with Braaten’s firearm, because investigators located an un-spent cartridge from his gun that linked to that location.

(Elliott) told Holmseth that Braaten lied to investigators about the cartridge, and only admitted that he had performed a function with his gun on the bridge after he was told the cartridge was found with his “fingerprints” on it.

Holmseth has obtained enough police cam video from the event to demonstrate the video has been altered – and segments of body-cam video that would have shown what occurred on the Columbia Road Bridge have been replaced with other video.

Following the 2015 shooting, UND Police Chief Eric Plummer issued a written reprimand to Braaten for his conduct regarding his police cams.

But life only got better for Braaten who was supplied a lawyer by the Fraternal Order of Police.

Grand Forks States Attorney David Jones said in a letter to Plummer that he viewed all the documents and videos surrounding the pursuit and shooting, and determined Braaten acted reasonably when he shot Elliott.

Braaten was subsequently hired by the GFPD to the exception of other candidates.

Some of the altered body-cam was turned over to WDAZ-TV by the GFPD; the regional North Dakota news station presented an entirely misleading story that made no mention of the fact the time of the shooting in the body-cam videos did not correspond with the dash-cams.

VISIT WWW.WRITEINTOACTION.COM

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Official narrative regarding police shooting of unarmed man in serious question

by Timothy Charles Holmseth on April 5, 2016, 7:20 A.M. CST

The Grand Forks Police Department (GFPD) records clerk that transcribed the 911 call that preceded the police shooting of David James Elliott, did not know the ‘time’ of the call she was transcribing for an investigative journalist.

It’s kind of important.

The 911 call set into motion a high speed chase, police shooting of an unarmed man, and the subsequent seizure of thousands of pills in the suspect’s vehicle (for which no criminal charges were ever brought).

“The Time was not stated within the PSAP recording of the call therefore I have no way of knowing the exact time of the call,” said Penny Johnson, Records Administration Bureau, GFPD.

Lt. Derik Zimmel, GFPD, said the document provided to Write Into Action “fulfilled” the records request. It’s not known why the GFPD would not consider the actual time of a 911 call to be part of any 911 records request.

Lt. Zimmel, as well as Becky Ault, director of Grand Forks County PSAP, both responded to subsequent requests for clarification – both stated the time of the call was 10:41 P.M., February 27, 2015.

Becky Ault, Grand Forks County PSAP Director

Becky Ault, Grand Forks County PSAP Director

However, the box allotted for “Time” remains empty in the actual transcription record.

Specific times are the key to understanding what occurred – and what did not occur.

Write Into Action’s request was for public records regarding an incident described in the official police shooting investigation conducted by the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) that said, “The cleaning woman inside the bank called in the complaint around 11:30 p.m., to 11:40 p.m.”

Lt. Zimmel said, “No such record exists.”

However – there appears to be a significant event that occurred at 11:30 P.M. on the night in question.

The BCI interview of ND State Trooper Brittany Schmidt said, “Trooper Schmidt stated the original call in regard to this case came in around 11 p.m.”

The BCI report continued, “Trooper Schmidt stated at 11:30 p.m., the vehicle from the earlier pursuit was located in Grand Forks. There was no pursuit at this time.”

The vehicle was located?

No pursuit?

Why?

Another anomalous statement regarding time is found in the BCI interview of GFPD officer Chris Brown who said he witnessed the pursuit at around 10:30 P.M.; which is before the 911 call was even made.

“In regard to the first (1st) pursuit, Grand Forks Police Department Officer Chris Brown said that he was at the Altru Hospital Emergency Room with a female that refused to leave, and a pursuit began at about 10:30 p.m./10:35 p.m. Grand Forks Police Department Officer Chris Brown saw the first (1st) pursuit proceed northbound on South Columbia Road past the Altru Hospital, but he was not involved. Grand Forks Police Department Officer Chris Brown continued with his call at the Altru Hospital Emergency Room until around 11:00 p.m.” the BCI report said.

How did Officer Brown observe a chase that began at 10:30/10:35 P.M. that was going north on Columbia Road past Altru when the pursuit did not begin until shortly before 11 P.M.?

The 11 P.M. start time for the pursuit is verified in a short video clip published by WDAZ TV.

“It started around 11 p.m. Friday February 27th when Grand Forks police tried to pull over a suspicious vehicle. Instead the driver of the vehicle, David Elliot, took off at speeds of more than 60 miles per hour thru a residential neighborhood,” WDAZ reported.

So what pursuit did Brown observe at 10:30/10:35 P.M.?

Write Into Action has identified a myriad of anomalies that call the official narrative in question.

Write Into Action continues to request public records and will report to the public.

VISIT WWW.WRITEINTOACTION.COM

by Timothy Charles Holmseth on March 21, 2016, 12:43 P.M. CST

Dash-cam video from a Grand Forks Police Department (GFPD) vehicle proves the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) is covering up a murder plot.

Video of the David James Elliott pursuit, published by WDAZ, shows law enforcement is collectively lying about the events that occurred on February 27, 2015.

BCI investigators and dash-cam video place Grand Forks Sheriff’s Deputy Any Schneider at I-29 near Thompson, North Dakota at the moment the pursuit is called off at approximately 11:08 P.M.

However, the BCI also tries to place Schneider at the Grand Force Air Force Base, eating dinner at 11:00 P.M.

The secret was exposed after a Write Into Action investigation using the very short segments of video that was released to the public; released only after Write Into Action (Timothy Charles Holmseth) made a written request for the video from the GFPD.

Write Into Action compared the video timeline to the events timeline in the BCI investigative records.

WDAZ screenshot Elliott pursuit termination

GFSO Deputy Andy Schneider

At 11:07:57 P.M. in the officer cam video, the WDAZ reporter says, “the chase is called off near Thompson”.

At the same time (11:07:57 P.M.) in the published video, an officer can be heard saying over the police radio, “Since your terminating you don’t want me to deploy…”

The officer heard referring to ‘deploying’ is Grand Forks County Sheriff’s Deputy Andy Schneider. He is referring to his plan to deploy spike-strips on I-29 South, one mile north of Thompson, against David Elliott.

Here is how we know that.

This is what Schneider told BCI investigators during the BCI investigation into the shooting of David Elliott in the Altru Hospital parking lot that occurred at the end of the hours long pursuit.

  1. Schneider told BCI investigators he believed the pursuit occurred between 10:45 – 11:00 P.M.
  1. Schneider told BCI investigators he was West of Thompson, North Dakota and heading to the Grand Forks Air Force base to have dinner when he learned of the pursuit.
  1. Schneider told BCI investigators he positioned his vehicle at a crossover one mile north of the Thompson, North Dakota exit.
  1. Schneider told BCI investigators he deployed his spike-strips.
  1. Schneider told BCI investigators GFPD Sgt. Mark Ellingson terminated the pursuit.

The BCI investigator reports Schneider did not have his emergency lights activated and walked into the ditch to avoid getting run into by David Elliott.

The aforementioned proves beyond all doubt Deputy Schneider was at the scene.

SCHNEIDER’S PRESENCE AT PURSUIT NOT MENTIONED IN GFSO AFFIDAVIT TO COURT

The Grand Forks County Sheriff’s Office attempted to conceal Schneider’s whereabouts and activities by omitting his presence near Thompson, North Dakota in an Affidavit filed with the court.

Now watch this.

In the very same report that the BCI investigators relays 1-5 above, he says, “Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Deputy Nate Moen and Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider went to the Grand Forks Air Force Base in Grand Forks, North Dakota, at approximately 11:00 p.m., to have dinner.”

DID YOU CATCH THAT, FOLKS?

We know from the video that Schneider was at I-29 at 11:07:57 P.M. putting out spike strips.

SOURCE FOR WRITE INTO ACTION ANALYSIS

In regard to the first (1st) pursuit with DAVID ELLIOTT, Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider said he was west of Thompson, North Dakota, when it began. Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider believed that it occurred between 10:45 p.m., to 11:00 p.m., and he was heading towards the Grand Forks Air Force Base, Grand Forks, North Dakota, for dinner. Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider overheard via the radio that Grand Forks Police Department Officer Dan Harvala had a pursuit that began in Grand Forks, North Dakota, but was now southbound on Interstate 29 (I-29).
-BCI

Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider positioned his vehicle at a crossover about one (1) mile north of the Thompson, North Dakota, exit. Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider notified Grand Forks Police Department that he had deployed his spike strips. Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider indicated that Grand Forks Police Department Sergeant Mark Ellingson terminated the pursuit. The Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) relayed that DAVID ELLIOTT had called 911 and told them that he was going to hurt himself or others if law enforcement did not quit following him. It should be noted that Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider did not have his emergency lights activated and walked into the ditch to avoid getting run into by DAVID ELLIOTT. DAVID ELLIOTT continued southbound on I-29. Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Deputy Nate Moen and Grand Forks Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Andy Schneider went to the Grand Forks Air Force Base in Grand Forks, North Dakota, at approximately 11:00 p.m., to have dinner.

READ ALSO –

BCI Records: North Dakota police completely LIED to public about shooting of unarmed man

Secret pursuit of David James Elliott began an entire HOUR before ‘suspicious vehicle’ call from Wells Fargo Bank

by Timothy Charles Holmseth on March 19, 2016, 11:37 A.M. CST

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University of North Dakota Police Chief Eric Plummer and GFPD Police Chief Mark Nelson give opposing account of events

GFPD Chief Mark Nelson

GFPD Chief Mark Nelson

by Timothy Charles Holmseth on February 21, 2016 at 1:44 P.M.

“No transcription requests, or requests for additional video footage to be processed, have been made for video or 911 records,”

– Lt. Derik Zimmel / GFPD

Law enforcement in North Dakota is attempting to cover-up the true facts and circumstances that led to the shooting of an unarmed man in a hospital parking lot.

The public is yet to learn why David James Elliott, a man with no criminal record, abruptly fled from police in February, 2015, before being shot three times in the head.

Despite availability, no request has been made for the critical 911 records of Elliott’s call to PSAP, which would shed light on the events, facts, and circumstances that ended when Elliott was shot outside the Emergency Room parking lot of Altru hospital in Grand Forks.

On February, 8, 2016, WDAZ, Forum Communications, Inc. broadcast select video featuring short clips from the chase and shooting.

Responding to a request for information by Write Into Action regarding records, Lt. Derik Zimmel, Grand Forks Police Department (GFPD) said “In-car video for primary pursuing vehicles for both pursuits in their entirety” was requested by the media.

Zimmel’s reference to “both pursuits” is based upon an assertion that two separate pursuits took place on the night in question.

The deceptive story being given to the public is that the initial David Elliott pursuit was cancelled, and then, re-initiated, over an hour later, when Elliott returned to Grand Forks city limits.

That’s false.

“MULTIPLE COUNTIES”

“The UND police officer was assisting in a pursuit that had covered multiple counties as well as the City of Grand Forks,” said UND Police Chief Eric Plummer during a press conference. [quote can be heard at the 20 second marker of the following video].

Plummer refers to ONE pursuit.

Either GFPD Chief Mark Nelson’s public information officer Lt. Derik Zimmel is lying; or UND Police Chief Eric Plummer is lying.

The facts show Plummer is telling the truth.

The pursuit was on-going after law enforcement claims they stopped chasing Elliott on I-29 South near Thompson, North Dakota.

But law enforcement does not want the public to know that.

Public record already in existence establish that Grand Forks County Sheriff’s and North Dakota Highway Patrol were pursuing Elliott on I-29 South from the Oslo, Minnesota interchange to Grand Forks, which is in the opposite direction of Thompson.

The details of the mysterious events occurring during that time window are contained in the 911 records.

The reason for calling it ‘two separate pursuits’ is to avoid discussing the activities of the Grand Forks Sheriff’s deputies and North Dakota Highway Patrol that were likely attempting kill Elliott.

The following excerpt is from an Opinion Letter authored by Grand Forks County States Attorney David T. Jones:

David Elliott Jones Narrative Quote

According to States Attorney Jones, Elliott telephoned 911 after the pursuit began. The 911 records of Elliott’s 911 call will reveal where he was located and what was occurring around him.

“No transcription requests, or requests for additional video footage to be processed, have been made for video or 911 records,” said Lt. Derik Zimmel, GFPD.

Write Into Action has determined a collective effort is being made to conceal from the public, just exactly what occurred after police claim they stopped chasing Elliott near Thompson, North Dakota; and over an hour later when they admit coming back into contact with Elliott near the Oslo, Minnesota I-29 interchange, which is in the opposite direction.

The truth is in the 911 records.

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by Timothy Charles Holmseth on February 13, 2016 at 10:27 A.M.

Humans hunting humans is a problem says Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney.

Laney spoke out in the wake of the shooting that killed Fargo Police Officer Jason Moszer during a stand-off Wednesday.

“How do you think that hits us? People are hunting us. And how do you think that sits with us? Yet we wear this badge with honor and pride and we’re going to go out every day and protect our community,” Laney said.

Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney

Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney

Laney’s ‘predator and prey’ analysis to characterize the fatal shooting of a police officer has captured the essence of a serious national epidemic.

People hunting people.

Laney’s expression has entered the dialogue of concerned Americans that believe the lives of “community” members such as Steven Avery – the Wisconsin man featured in the Netflix documentary Making a Murder – are all valuable lives.

81 percent of American’s believe Avery is innocent according to a January, 2016 poll.

The North Dakota sheriff’s ‘hunting’ analysis has given rise to a conversation regarding the unavailability of police records and bizarre under-reporting of an officer-involved shooting in Grand Forks, North Dakota in 2015.

The 2015 shooting of David James Elliott involved the actual ‘hunt’ of a man by police for over two hours; the details of which have being seemingly hidden since the very beginning.

Hidden facts, circumstances, and obfuscated evidence are primary components of the rapidly spreading Steven Avery Syndrome.

In February of 2015, a University of North Dakota Police officer unloaded 12 rounds into the vehicle cab of David Elliott; an unarmed man that had managed to roll his hobbled vehicle to the emergency room entrance of a hospital. There in the parking lot while on the telephone he was shot – he was hit six times – three time in the head – once in the face – but survived.

The details of the hours leading up to the event are by any standard, very mysterious.

Elliott, unarmed, with no criminal record, telephoned 911 shortly after police began pursuing him and is believed to have told 911 why he refused to stop.

It is known three police officers were suspended following the event but no updates have ever been given.

The bizarre actions of law enforcement were captured in a scathing editorial by the Grand Forks Herald.

North Dakota law enforcement will not relay to the public what Elliott told 911 or provide a timeline of events regarding the pursuit, which involved the Grand Forks Police Department, Grand Forks Sheriff’s Office, North Dakota Highway Patrol, and University of North Dakota Police.

Only after a formal document request was made for the records by Write Into Action, did police release video to WDAZ TV. The news piece only featured officer-cam segments from the high-speed chase but did not mention the 911 call or explain why Elliott fled.

The 911 call and officer cam video, which will reveal the route of the Elliott pursuit (which could involve another State – Minnesota), and reveals what he was saying to 911 while officers that were behind him without their red-lights activated, is not readily available to the public.

Law enforcement has presented the two hours long event as ‘two separate pursuits’ while describing the pursuit in the middle of the event as officers simply “following” Elliott through the night.

Why North Dakota law enforcement is concealing the details of Elliott’s 911 call is not known.

Following the Elliott shooting in 2015, North Dakota law enforcement stonewalled the media and refused to communicate with the public about what happened.

The bizarre nature of the Elliott pursuit and shooting is illuminated by North Dakota law enforcement’s complete opposite reaction to the shooting of Fargo Police Officer Jason Moszer.

In the Moszer shooting, law enforcement has adhered to the law and been very transparent – immediately alerting the media to the public safety issue and providing regular updates.

All of the same law enforcement agencies involved in the Elliott shooting are reportedly involved in the Moszer situation, including the Police Department, North Dakota Highway Patrol, Sheriff’s Office, and BCI.

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by Timothy Charles Holmseth on February 9, 2016 at 1:44 A.M.

On February 8, 2016, WDAZ aired a news story with video of the David Elliott pursuit and shooting that took place on February 27-28, 2015.

The news report contained a patently and provably false statement.

During a voice narrative featuring video of a high speed chase, the reporter said, “Abut an hour later a second pursuit begins when Elliott re-enters the city,” WDAZ reported.

That is a patently false statement that misled the public.

Factually – the pursuit was ongoing the entire time and there was no “second pursuit” as reported by WDAZ.

During the first press conference following the pursuit and shooting, a news reporter (believed by this writer to be Steve Wagner of The Herald) said, “Well you said multiple counties, so this thing went out of town and back into town.”

UND Police Chief Eric Plummer responded, “Yes, that’s our knowledge yes. It was initially initiated outside of our county, ended up coming within Grand Forks County, within the City and outside of the City, so yes.”

The aforementioned exchange can be heard on the You Tube video below entitled ‘Police shoot unarmed man in front of hospital.’ The applicable portion begins at 6:08.

Additionally – the WDAZ news report never once mentioned the fact David Elliott called 911 the night police began to stalk him. It appears Elliott was on the telephone with 911 during much or all of the pursuit.

The news report contained another bizarre anomaly that shows deviation from the original story regarding the night in question.

“It started around 11 p.m. Friday February 27th when Grand Forks police tried to pull over a suspicious vehicle. Instead the driver of the vehicle, David Elliot, took off at speeds of more than 60 miles per hour thru a residential neighborhood,” WDAZ reported.

The statement referring to 11 p.m. as a start time is accompanied by exciting video of a high speed chase.

But something is wrong.

On March 3, 2015, KNOX reported, “On Friday, February 27, 2015 at approximately 10:41 p.m. officers from the Grand Forks Police Department responded to a suspicious vehicle call in the parking lot of Wells Fargo Bank located on S. Columbia Rd.  After the officers arrived; the operator of the suspect vehicle, later identified as David Elliott, left the area and failed to stop for officers after they had also witnessed a traffic violation committed by this operator.”

That places almost twenty minutes of time and activity between David Elliott and the police that is not accounted for by WDAZ or any other news agency. The reason Elliott was driving over 100 mph and trying to get away may be something that took place between him and the police during those twenty minutes.

The police did not release any video involving those twenty minutes and no 911 records were released whatsoever.

Only all the public records will show what was really going on.

The release of the video appears to have been prompted by the GoFundMe erected by Timothy Charles Holmseth (me); an investigative journalist seeking all the public records surrounding the entire night.

Holmseth was forced to turn to the public for assistance after the GFPD made obtaining the public records too expensive.

You can visit Timothy Holmseth’s GoFundMe to view two videos that show what REALLY HAPPENED and why the public needs to see all the records regarding the night in question.

READ Holmseth’s letter to GFPD Chief of Police Mark Nelson.

WDAZ

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